Page title

Intro

Executive summary

Arts and culture is considered to be important.

  • 80% agree  the Western Australian Government  should invest in arts and culture to ensure they are available to the public
  • 93% agree it is important for school children to  have access to arts and culture  as part of their education.

Perceptions of individual and community value remain steady.

When asked ‘how valuable is the role of arts and culture in your life?’, the Value Index Score is 62.

  • Results have remained fairly steady over the past 10 years.
  • Similar to previous years, perceptions of individual value are lowest across regional WA. Perceptions of value are also lower among males and those with lower levels of education.
  • Perceptions of individual value are highest among females, people who live in inner metropolitan suburbs and those with higher levels of education.

Arts and culture is seen to have a valuable role in the community with a Value Index Score of 75.

  • This is the highest score over the past 10 years.
  • Perceptions of community value are highest among females, Western Suburbs residents and those with a disability or impairment.

Most people believe the arts benefits the broader community, not just those who participate.

Only 23% of respondents agree that “the arts only helps those people who participate, not the broader community”.

  • Results have remained steady over recent years.
  • Males and people who mainly speak a language other than English at home are more likely to agree that "the arts only help those who participate, not the broader community." Females, those living in the Western Suburbs and Inner South Suburbs, and people with higher levels of education are more likely to disagree with this statement.

Most believe arts and culture contributes to WA’s sense of community and identity.

When asked ‘how valuable is the contribution of arts and culture to your sense of community in WA?’, the Value Index Score is 71, an increase of 3 index points since 2017.

  • The Value Index Score is higher among people living in the Western Suburbs, females, those with children aged 12-17 years and people with a disability or impairment.

When asked ‘how valuable is the contribution of arts and culture to the identity of the state?’, the Value Index Score is 71, marginally increasing year on year since 2016.

  • The Value Index score is highest among Western Suburbs residents.

The arts continue to make people feel good.

The Agreement Index Score is 75; on par with previous years.

  • Level of agreement is greatest among Western Suburbs residents and those with higher levels of education.

Perceived ease of accessing arts and culture is on par with last year’s high score

The Ease of Access Index Score is 64, up from a low of 53 in 2012 and on par with last year’s score of 65.

  • 56% feel it is easy to access or participate in arts and cultural activities in WA.
  • Ease of access is highest in the Western Suburbs and improves with level of household income.
  • Access is most difficult for people living in regional WA.

Attendance or participation in the arts has declined.

78% of respondents have attended or participated in an arts and cultural activity over the past 12 months; steadily declining from a high of 82% in 2014.

  • 39% of respondents have attended or participated in an arts and cultural activity over the past month, continuing to fall from 50% in 2014; and 65% of respondents had attended or participated in an arts and cultural activity over the past 3 months, dropping from 73% in 2015.
  • Lack of attendance or participation over the past 2 years has risen to 15% from 9% in 2016.

Level of participation varies across the community.

  • Frequent participation (attended 5+ times in the past 3 months) is more likely among people in the Western Suburbs, those with higher levels of education and on higher incomes (over $150k per year).
  • Non-attendance is more likely in regional WA and among seniors, low income earners and those with lower levels of education.

Government and corporate support is considered to be essential for the arts.

Only 20% of respondents agree with the statement “all theatre, ballet and opera companies and public art galleries, etc should rely on their tickets sales alone”.

More funding wanted for the arts.

73% of respondents would be prepared to contribute more money to expand provision of and access to arts and culture.

  • 55% of respondents believe $2 per person per week is too low as an allocation for arts and culture.
  • 40% would be prepared to double the contribution, up from 25% in 2016.
  • Support for higher funding is greater in the Western and Inner South suburbs and among younger adults, those with younger children and people who mainly speak a language other than English at home.

Perceived value of the WA film and television industry is on par with the 10 year average.

68% of respondents rate the industry highly.

  • The Value Index Score is 72, on par with the ten year average.
  • Perceived value is highest in the Western Suburbs.
  • Perceived value is lower among males, those with higher levels of household income and people who mainly speak a language other than English at home.

Perceived access to WA film and TV has dropped since 2017

33% of respondents consider it to be easy to access Western Australian produced film and television productions.

  • The Ease of Access Index Score has dropped 10 Index points from 61 to 51 since 2017, though it is slightly higher than earlier years.
Page reviewed 25 June 2019