Statement of compliance

For the year ended 30 June 2019
Hon David Templeman MLA
Minister for Local Government; Heritage; Culture and the Arts


In accordance with section 63 of the Financial Management Act 2006, I hereby submit for your information and presentation to Parliament, the Annual Report of the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries for the reporting period ended 30 June 2019.

The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006. 

Duncan Ord OAM
Director General

Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries
10 September 2019

Contents

Foreword
The department at a glance
Executive summary
Agency overview

Agency performance

Significant issues and trends

Disclosures and compliance

Appendices

Foreword

Director General, Duncan Ord OAM
 
Once again it has been a challenging and rewarding year for the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries as we work to facilitate enlivened and successful communities and economic development. From partnering with local government to deliver good governance to communities, to providing opportunities in the hospitality sector by reducing red tape on the liquor and gambling industries, the department plays an important role in the lives of people in Western Australia.
 
This year’s annual report highlights the complexity and diversity of the work undertaken by the department as we are responsible for assisting in the administration of 29 pieces of legislation on behalf of our portfolio Ministers. The department has assisted in preparing amendments to the Liquor Control Act 1988 and the Local Government Act 1995 in line with election commitments; and supported the passage of legislation through Parliament. The introduction of amendments to liquor licensing laws will help to create a more relaxed and tourism friendly hospitality industry for all Western Australians to enjoy. The Act has already enabled WA liquor producers to showcase their products at events such as music and food festivals. The Local Government Act reform will help find ways to empower local governments to better deliver quality governance and services to WA communities now and into the future. 
 
Community consultation on further legislative change undertaken this year included the Stop Puppy Farming initiative to improve animal welfare outcomes by stopping puppy farming and irresponsible dog breeding. This important reform attracted over 4,500 submissions, and public interest in the welfare of pets was confirmed with a similar number of submissions received as part of the review of the Cat Act 2011 and Dog Amendment Act 2013. In addition, more than 3,000 submissions have been received on proposals on a new Act for Local Government. 
 
The department has been ambitious in delivering State Government goals through our specific services and outcomes and I am immensely proud of the success we have achieved so far for our Western Australian communities. In the sport and recreation space, the department has undertaken significant work in championing equality in sports leadership. Currently, there is a stark imbalance between male and female management in sports organisations. The department would like the sector to strive for gender balance in its leadership roles. The Gender Diversity Case for Change report has been released to endorse a target of 50% female representation in sports leadership roles. The department continues to work with WA’s sport and recreation organisations to help them achieve greater gender diversity in their management structures.
 
A new funding model for sport and recreation organisations was informed by the department’s Strategic Funding Review, which contained 22 findings and 12 recommendations. The new model will ensure the department’s funding programs are more equitable, transparent, and effective in supporting the industry. Some of the department’s key deliverables include the delivery of three-year funding agreements for the Industry Investment Program, developing an Engagement Strategy with Sport Australia, and evaluating the Targeted Participation Program. These are important pieces of work the department is undertaking to create opportunities for all sports to grow grassroots participation and be sustainable into the future.
 
In creating sustainable industries, the department developed the WA Motorsport Strategy to provide a framework for the motorsport industry to safely and sustainably develop the sport. The department is working with the motorsport industry on many great initiatives, including establishing an industry working group, creating a framework to guide future investment in the State’s venues and facilities, and developing best-practice regulatory guidelines to improve safety and governance. The department is committed to helping the industry to implement these initiatives – with the ultimate goal of empowering WA motorsport to drive its own future.
 
I would like to highlight the success in the culture and arts space with the new Contemporary Music Fund Grant Program. This program assists homegrown contemporary music artists with projects that enable them to produce and promote their work – building links nationally and internationally. It also aims to improve the representation of Aboriginal, regional, cultural and gender diverse music artists in the industry. 
 
An overwhelming success for the department was Revealed, which invited Aboriginal artists and art centre staff and boards to come together to participate in a Professional Development Program, Public Symposium Artists in Conversation, Marketplace Event, and Exhibition that was accompanied by a Virtual Online Tour component. In the largest Revealed to date, the exhibition featured more than 120 emerging Aboriginal artists from the State. Total public attendance increased by 72% on the previous year, with a record of 22,681 visitors overall. Impressively, Revealed generated $619,235 in total sales, which is a record-high in the program’s 11-year history.
 
The department is working on a WA Cultural Infrastructure Strategy that identifies opportunities in urban, suburban, regional and remote areas for new or improved cultural infrastructure that will lead to more vibrant and empowered communities and economies. The Strategy will celebrate WA’s rich traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture and promote our State as a destination of choice. 
 
WA’s Aboriginal cultural values will underpin the department’s strategy to enhance all our cultural places and spaces contributing to WA’s unique sense of identity. The department has already undertaken stakeholder consultation on cultural infrastructure as part of the Strategy to help enrich the lives of Western Australians by having greater access to art and cultural experiences. 
 
The department launched the second edition of the book No Less Worthy, which acknowledges the contributions of the 135 Aboriginal men with links to Western Australia who volunteered in WWI. Many who enlisted were rejected on the grounds of race due to the policies being implemented at the time. It is a remarkable book on several fronts – it contains biographies, family memorabilia and unique historical images from WA, including the swearing in of recruits at the old Drill Hall on Francis Street opposite the Western Australian Museum. The research has led to a doubling of the previously known number of Western Australia’s Aboriginal volunteers from WWI. The book also sets a national standard and provides a blueprint to inspire other states to do the same.
 
Western Australia is one of the most culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse states in Australia, with 32% of the population born overseas. The State is home to people originating from 190 countries, speaking around 240 languages and dialects, including Indigenous languages, and following more than 100 faiths. In recognition of WA’s multiculturalism, the inaugural Perth Chung Wah Festival was held in May 2019. The Festival celebrated the Chinese community’s sporting and cultural heritage and showcased WA as an exciting and desirable tourism destination. The department provided extensive support, including the approval required for vendors and visa applications. With around 20,000 people who attended the Festival throughout the week, it was a great success and work is underway by the department to celebrate more cultural communities through these types of festivals in the future.
 
The new public transport concessions for people seeking asylum, known as the Asylum Seeker Hub (ASH) concession card, which was a cross-agency initiative with the Department of Transport. The ineligibility of people seeking asylum to have access to concession fares for use on public transport had a significant impact on this group and their ability to access services in the community. The provision of the ASH concessions will help asylum seekers to have equitable access to appropriate services in order to actively participate and contribute to the economic, social and cultural development of our State.
 
These are only some of the department’s achievements, there are many more highlighted in this report that I am very proud of and that would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of staff. I would like to thank all Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries’ staff for their outstanding contribution over the year. Delivering excellent outcomes for Western Australian communities gives us an extraordinary sense of satisfaction in the work we do, and the department will continue to commit our focus on creating enlivened and successful communities and economy for all to enjoy. 
 
Duncan Ord OAM
Director General
Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries 
10 September 2019

The department at a glance

Overview of the department major statistics
Department's major statistics

Executive summary

The DLGSC at a glance

The DLGSC delivers services that play an important role in the lives of people in Western Australia. Working across government and industry sectors, the department supports and provides sporting, recreational, cultural and artistic policy, programs and activities for locals and visitors to the State. The department also provides regulation and support to local governments and the racing, gaming and liquor industries to maintain quality and compliance with legislation.
 
The work undertaken by the department is underpinned by our vision, values and strategic direction, which guide the department’s performance against financial and service delivery outcomes. This financial year, the department achieved many successful outcomes to benefit the community and these achievements are detailed within this report. A snapshot of some of the department’s success is noted below:
 
  • Local Government Act reform – The Act amendment introduced universal training for elected members, including candidate induction, essential training for newly elected councillors and ongoing professional development.
  • Puppy Farming – More than 4,500 submissions were received, which enabled the department to release a summary consultation report to improve animal welfare outcomes by stopping puppy farming and irresponsible dog breeding.
  • Languages Week – The department developed learning resources for teachers and parents to promote language learning, which included videos exploring the personal meaning languages had for 11 Western Australians.
  • Perth Chung Wah Cultural Festival – Around 20,000 people attended the week-long festival, including 32 international guests, to celebrate the WA Chinese community’s sporting and cultural heritage.
  • Contemporary Music Fund – The program commenced in January 2019, with 38 successful applications. Support was also provided to targeted initiatives, including Safer Venues and WAMCon.
  • Revealed – The exhibition featured approximately 120 emerging Aboriginal artists from the State. Revealed was experienced by more than 22,600 people, which generated $619,235 in sales.
  • WA Cultural Infrastructure Strategy – Consultation resulted in a total of 481 key stakeholder engagements with the draft Strategy.
  • New museum project – The department is working to deliver the $400 million new museum project, which will explore the extraordinary history, distinctiveness, creativity and diversity of our State and region.
  • Point of consumption tax – The tax was introduced to ensure online wagering operators pay tax on wagering conducted in Western Australia.
  • Gambling legislation – The department is helping to implement the government’s policy of supporting a strong and sustainable racing industry and responsible gambling practices in Western Australia.
  • Women in leadership – The department has provided support for the sport and recreation industry to achieve the target of 50% representation of women in leadership positions. This includes governance training and the Gender Diversity Case for Change report, which outlines the benefits of a balanced leadership structure.
  • Strategic Funding Review – The sport and recreation review contains 22 findings and 12 recommendations, and focusses on ensuring the department’s sport and recreation funding programs are effective in supporting the industry.
  • Regional Programs – The department’s regional offices continue to support community organisations in the delivery of regional sport and recreation to regional communities; supporting 60 employed staff throughout the sports house network. More than $8 million was invested into regional programs and infrastructure projects in 2018-2019.
  • No Less Worthy – The department launched the publication No Less Worthy, to acknowledge the contribution of Aboriginal people with links to WA who volunteered to enlist in WWI. Through significant genealogical and archival research, the department identified 135 volunteers.
  • Partnership Acceptance Learning Sharing (PALS) Program – Around 141,000 students participated in a diverse range of projects to increase understanding of Aboriginal history, culture and language and promote reconciliation.
  • Born Digital Strategy – The State Records Office released the Strategy to help improve the direction for the creation and management of government records in a purely digital environment.
The department continues to create and build on its policies, programs and activities to further contribute to the lives of Western Australian communities and families and build on the Premier’s priorities: a strong economy, a bright future, a liveable environment, a safer community, regional prosperity, and Aboriginal wellbeing. The department’s key performance indicators help to illustrate how the department is performing its services to reach desired outcomes and government goals and priorities.
 
As part of the annual audit by the Office of Auditor General (OAG) regarding the department’s Outcomes Based Management (OBM) Framework, the department is committed to ensuring our measures are reliable, auditable and that there is appropriate evidence to support the data reported, as required by the OBM Framework processes. As such, the department is reviewing indicators pertaining to the State Information Management and Archival service and the Compliance Audits and Inspections service; to ensure its measures better reflect the role undertaken by the department and meet the requirements of OAG.
 
The department acknowledges the changing landscape in which it operates, which impacts the way services are delivered. This includes managing risk in a digital era, which is becoming increasingly complex, including the risk of cyber threats. The department has established an ICT Security Compliance Plan to ensure systems are kept up-to-date, to review the ongoing effectiveness of the ICT security function and to ensure department staff are security conscious. Further information relating to issues and trends are noted in the report.
 
Also noted in the report is disclosures and compliance, particularly in relation to finance disclosures, ministerial directives, governance disclosures, and government policy requirements. This includes the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan; where the department works to ensure that people with disability, their families and carers have the same opportunities, rights and responsibilities as others to accessing the services, information and facilities the department provides. As part of Freedom of Information, the department is committed to making information available outside the FOI process wherever possible to improve openness and transparency in the delivery of our services to the community. Further detail on these disclosures and compliance is noted within the report.
 
The annual report provides a summary of the work achieved by the department in 2018-2019. Looking ahead, the department will continue to build on the success from this financial year as it delivers services that will benefit all Western Australians.

Agency overview

Agency profile

The DLGSC works with partners across government and within its diverse sectors to enliven the Western Australian community and economy through support for and provision of sporting, recreational, cultural and artistic policy, programs and activities for locals and visitors to the State. 
 
The department provides regulation and support to local governments and the racing, gaming and liquor industries to maintain quality and compliance with relevant legislation, for the benefit of all Western Australians.

Strategic direction

DLGSC vision

Enlivened and successful communities and economy 

DLGSC mission 

To facilitate lively communities and economy and the offering of outstanding and inclusive sporting and cultural experiences 

DLGSC values 

  • Vision
  • Excellence
  • Integrity 
  • Diversity
  • Leadership 

DLGSC objectives

  • To partner with local government to deliver good governance to community
  • To promote participation and achievement in sport, recreation, culture and arts 
  • To support and grow the cultural industries 
  • To promote the benefits of cultural diversity and social inclusion
  • To provide opportunities in the hospitality sector by reducing red tape on the liquor and gambling industries 
  • To celebrate Aboriginal culture and preserve history and traditions 

DLGSC approach

We will achieve this by:
  • Working collaboratively across other State Government departments 
  • Creating synergies and finding efficiencies in business functions 
  • Responding proactively to State Government imperatives such as election commitments and stated strategic priorities 
  • Contributing to the achievement of Government targets 
  • Community focussed engagement and partnerships

Responsible Ministers

The DLGSC was established on 1 July 2017 under the Public Sector Management Act 1994. At 30 June 2019, the department was responsible to the following Ministers: 

  • Hon David Templeman Dip Tchg BEd MLA, Minister for Local Government; Heritage; Culture and the Arts 
  • Hon Michael (Mick) Murray MLA, Minister for Seniors and Ageing; Volunteering; Sport and Recreation 
  • Hon Paul Papalia CSC MLA, Minister for Tourism; Racing and Gaming; Small Business; Defence Issues; Citizenship and Multicultural Interests
  • Hon Benjamin (Ben) Wyatt MLA LLB, MSc, Treasurer; Minister for Finance; Energy; Aboriginal Affairs

Legislation administered

The department assisted in the administration of the following legislation on behalf of its portfolio Ministers as at 30 June 2019.
  1. Art Gallery Act 1959
  2. Caravan Parks and Camping Grounds Act 1995
  3. Cat Act 2011
  4. City of Perth Act 2016
  5. Combat Sports Act 1987
  6. Control of Vehicles (Off-road Areas) Act 1978
  7. Dog Act 1976
  8. Dog Amendment Act 2013
  9. Gaming and Betting (Contracts and Securities) Act 1985
  10. Library Board of Western Australia Act 1951
  11. Liquor Control Act 1988
  12. Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1960
  13. Local Government Act 1995
  14. Major Events (Aerial Advertising) Act 2009
  15. Museum Act 1969
  16. Perth Theatre Trust Act 1979
  17. Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003
  18. Racing Bets Levy Act 2009
  19. Racing Penalties (Appeals) Act 1990
  20. Racing Restriction Act 2003
  21. South Fremantle Oil Installations Pipe Line Act 1948
  22. Sports Drug Testing Act 2001
  23. State Records Act 2000
  24. Sunset Reserve Transformation Act 2014
  25. The Western Australian Turf Club Act 1892
  26. Western Australian Greyhound Racing Association Act 1981
  27. Western Australian Sports Centre Trust Act 1986
  28. Western Australian Trotting Association Act 1946
  29. Western Australian Turf Club (Property) Act 1944

Enabling legislation

In performing its functions, the DLGSC is compliant with relevant law, including, but not limited to:
  • Auditor General Act 2006
  • Disabilities Services Act 1993
  • Equal Opportunity Act 1984
  • Financial Management Act 2006
  • Freedom of Information Act 1992
  • Industrial Relations Act 1979
  • Legal Deposit Act 2012
  • Minimum Conditions of Employment Act 1993
  • Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • Public Interest Disclosure Act 2003
  • Public Sector Management Act 1994
  • Salaries and Allowances Act 1975
  • State Records Act 2000
  • State Superannuation Act 2000
  • State Supply Commission Act 1991
  • Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act 1981

Operational structure

Structure as at 30 June 2019
Operational structure

Portfolio structure

DLGSC interagency relationships
 
Portfolio structure

Executive leadership

The DLGSC has the following business areas: local government, regulation, infrastructure, sport and recreation, culture and the arts, Aboriginal History Unit, Office of Multicultural Interests, and State Records Office. These business areas are supported by the operational areas of corporate services, finance, and office of the Director General.
Below are the executive leadership roles at 30 June 2019. 
Executive Leadership Roles
 Position  Role
 Director General  Duncan Ord OAM
 Deputy Director General  Michael Connolly
 Assistant Director General  Margaret Butcher
 Executive Director Corporate Services  Glen Kar
 Acting Executive Director Sport and Recreation  Rob Didcoe
 Executive Director Culture and the Arts  Colin Walker
 Executive Director Planning and Service Delivery  Vacant
 Executive Director Infrastructure  Lisa Fanciulli
 Director Aboriginal History Unit  Anna Wyatt
 Acting Executive Director Office of Multicultural Interests  Kim Ellwood
 Director and Portfolio Chief Financial Officer  Shanaeya Sherdiwala

Business areas

Local government

The business area supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations and to improve capability in the sector. The business area provides advice and support across the local government sector and uses a risk-based approach to identify those needing targeted intervention and assistance. The business area supports the sector in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995. The business area reviews and administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community. Through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support, the business area assists local governments with best practice in the sector. 

The business area is responsible for managing the State Local Government Partnership Agreement and monitoring the Committee of Perth in accordance with the City of Perth Act 2016. 

Regulation

The business area receives, processes and determines applications in accordance with the legislation. The business area provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries and applications are considered and determined on their merits in accordance with the relevant legislative requirements. The business area also performs audits and inspections to verify that the provision of gambling and liquor is conducted in a responsible and lawful manner. Under the legislative framework provided in the Liquor Control Act 1988, the business area undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are operating and being maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations.

Infrastructure

The business area provides leadership to promote and guide infrastructure planning and develop sound policy based on the key principles of facility provision. The business area manages and maintains key civic infrastructure across the sport and recreation and culture and the arts portfolios and provides client agency services for the planning and delivery of major State sport and cultural infrastructure projects in line with the Department of Treasury’s Strategic Asset Management framework. The business area also delivers the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund, State Sporting Infrastructure Fund and a range of infrastructure related election commitments. The business area provides strategic policy, leadership, and funding support on civic infrastructure planning and delivery across local government.

Sport and recreation 

The business area provides strategic leadership and support for the sport and active recreation* industry across Western Australia, through funding and advice to State sporting organisations, community organisations and local governments. The business area proactively engages with the sector to determine and implement strategic responses to current and emerging issues and to review the department’s programs and services. The business area works with the industry to support athletes and teams to achieve at all levels, including local, national and international competitions. By building on the existing capabilities of individuals and organisations, the business area enables them to operate at their best and provide quality opportunities for participation in sport and active recreation. The business area also provides experiential outdoor activities to the Western Australian community through the management of recreation camps. The sport and recreation camps are a successful community service operation delivering quality, affordable, accessible camp experiences in Western Australia.
 
*Active recreation refers to activities engaged in for the purpose of relaxation, health and wellbeing or enjoyment with the primary activity requiring physical exertion, and the primary focus on human activity.

Culture and the arts 

The business area supports the delivery of arts and culture activities through strong evidence-based policy, research and funding across Western Australia to achieve State Government outcomes. The business area undertakes the development and implementation of research and industry projects to strengthen the policy basis of its programs and services. Working with a range of stakeholders and partners, the business area provides information and opportunities to foster growth, connections and access to industry intelligence. This includes statistics on cultural funding, employment, attendance and participation, and Western Australia’s values and attitudes towards culture and the arts. The business area funds non-government arts organisations as a base from which they can then generate additional income through sponsorship, box office and other agencies to support their annual program of activities. It also provides project funding to provide artists and creatives to undertake a broad range of projects and activities across multiple art forms. Investment in arts and culture is essential to ensure Western Australians have ongoing access to arts and culture activities. 

Aboriginal History Unit

The business area assists the Aboriginal community by providing an Aboriginal family history service to connect Aboriginal families as well as significant projects that promote reconciliation in schools, businesses and the wider community. The business area’s family history service assists Aboriginal people and organisations to access historical family records and genealogical information. It also provides a specialist research service for Native Title claimants and general researchers. Over the past year, the business area has received an increased number of requests for records in response to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.  Through the Partnerships Acceptance Learning Sharing (PALS) program the business area provides grant funding to WA schools to develop projects that celebrate Aboriginal culture and promote reconciliation within their local communities. The Reconciliation Week Street Banner project enables the corporate sector, government agencies and the wider community to publicly acknowledge their pride in our State’s Aboriginal culture and commitment to reconciliation through the public display of banners.

Office of Multicultural Interests

Through the development and implementation of policies, programs and services, the business area aims to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism. Western Australia is one of the most culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse states in Australia, with 32% of the population born overseas. The State is home to people originating from 190 countries, speaking around 240 languages and dialects, including Indigenous languages, and following more than 100 faiths. The business area works to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism in WA through the development and implementation of policies, programs and services. This requires strategies that include the whole community, including business and industry groups, government and non-government agencies, culturally and linguistically diverse communities and the wider community. 

State Records Office (SRO)

The SRO on behalf of the State Records Commission, regulates record keeping across the State and local government sector. SRO is also the custodian of the largest and most significant documentary heritage collection in Western Australia. The State Records Office fosters best practice information management processes throughout government to enable effective, efficient, open and accountable business practices. The State Records Office ensures the identification and preservation of WA’s State archives and facilitates public access to this rich source of historical and evidential information.

Workforce

DLGSC demographics at 30 June 2019.
 

Workforce demographics

  • Women: 286
  • Men: 206
DLGSC – Employment type   Women   Men 
 Permanent Full-time  140 151 
 Permanent Part-time 74  13 
 Fixed Term Full-time 33  25 
 Fixed Term Part-time 18  10 
 Casual paid 16 
 *Other

*Includes staff on secondment and public sector trainees.

Workforce diversity

   Number Number of senior management roles   Percentage
of women in management roles
Women in senior management   5  12  42%
  Number  Percentage of employees 
Youth (employees under 25)  16  3%
Identify as an Aboriginal Australian  7  1%
Identify as people with disability  17  3%

Performance Management Framework

The DLGSC achieves its State Government desired outcomes through the delivery of 10 key services. While DLGSC contributes to all of the government’s Outcomes Based Service Delivery goals, its primary contribution is to the following government goals: 

  • Better places: A quality environment with liveable and affordable communities and vibrant regions.
  • Strong communities: Safe communities and supported families.

The below table illustrates the relationship between the DLGSC desired outcomes and the most relevant government goal; noting that, the numbering of the services and their associated efficiency indicators reflects their numbering in the department’s Budget Paper. The DLGSC’s performance is highlighted in comparative data illustrated in the outcomes and key effectiveness indicators and services and key efficiency indicators tables. Further information is outlined later in the report in the Key Performance Indicators section.

 Government Goal  Outcome Services
 

Better Places:

A quality environment
with liveable and
affordable communities
and vibrant regions
 Local governments were capable and well-governed  Service 1 – Regulation and support of local government
 A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeing  

Service 3 – Arts industry support

Service 4 – Research, policy development, information and support
 Efficient and effective services to the culture and arts portfolio and government  Service 5 – Corporate and asset and infrastructure support to the culture and arts portfolio
 To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with legislation  

Service 17- Licensing – evaluation and determination of applicants

Service 18 – Compliance audits and inspections
 A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participating and develops talent  

Service 19 – Industry leadership and infrastructure development

Service 20 – Building capacity and participation

Service 21 – Recreation camps management
 

Strong Communities:

Safe communities and supported families 
 Western Australia was recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural society  Service 2 – Promotion and support of multiculturalism






The numbering of the services and their associated efficiency indicators reflects their numbering in the department’s Budget Paper.

Outcomes and key effectiveness indicators

Reference to the year 2018-2019 in the detailed key performance indicators information is a reference to the reporting period. While the department did not exist prior to 1 July 2017, comparative data has been disclosed from the former departments’ audited data.

Desired outcomes   Key effectiveness indicator 2015-2016  2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Target
2018-2019
Actual
Local governments were capable and well-governed  LG 1: Percentage of local governments that did not have an action taken against them under the department’s compliance framework  54% 32% 29%  55%  49% 
 LG 2: Percentage of local governments with Integrated Planning and Reporting plans reviewed  100% 96%  38%  25%  87% 
Western Australia was recognised as a vibrant and effective multicultural society.  OMI 1: Percentage of organisations and individuals who report that the Office of Multicultural Interests had a positive impact on the promotion and support of multiculturalism  84% 83%  89%  80%  94% 
 OMI 2: Percentage of community grants for multicultural organisations that were acquitted against identified outcomes  80% 94%   93%  85%  98%
A sustainable arts and cultural sector that enhances social and economic wellbeing.  CA 3: Ratio of government funding to other income  1:17.16  1:6.29 1:6.12  1:3.61  1:6.33 
 CA 4: Public value of the contribution of arts and culture to the State’s identity and community  68 69  71  68  73 
Efficient and effective services to the Culture and Arts portfolio and government.  CAP 1: Percentage of annual infrastructure maintenance budget expended on portfolio infrastructure maintenance requirements  91.6%  99.4%  98.0%  95.0%  101%
To promote, monitor and enforce responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services in accordance with the legislation.  RGL 1: Percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria  98% 98%  97%  94%  97% 
A strong and diverse sport and recreation system in Western Australia that is accessible, encourages maximum participation and develops talent.  SR 1: Satisfaction rating of policy development and leadership provided by the department  93%  93% 89%  85%  91% 
 SR 2: Satisfaction rating of the department’s consultation advice to clients  88% 88%  85%  90%  86% 
 SR 3: Satisfaction rating of the department’s grant’s management  88% 89%  84%  85%  90% 
 SR 4: Satisfaction rating of the department’s programs, initiatives and resources  93% 92%  90% 90%  91% 
 SR 5: Western Australian participation in organised sport and active recreation  56% 56%  57%  56%  60% 
 SR 6: Satisfaction rating of recreation camps management and service delivery  95% 94%  94%  87%  94% 

Services and key efficiency indicators

While the department did not exist prior to 1 July 2017, comparative data has been disclosed from the former departments’ audited data. The numbering of the services and their associated efficiency indicators reflects their numbering in the department’s Budget Paper.

 Delivered services  Efficiency indicator 2015-2016
2016-2017

2017-2018
Actual
2018-2019
Target
2018-2019
Actual

 1. Regulation and Support of Local Government

 1.1 Average cost per local government for regulation and support  $76,070  $78,881  $98,803  $86,051  $76,743
 2. Promotion and Support of Multiculturalism  2.1 Average cost per project to support and promote multiculturalism  $101,061  $99,118  $110,916  $111,717  $87,974
 2.2 Number of grants and service agreements per full time equivalent  27  33  36  25  33
 3. Arts Industry Support  3.1 Grants operations expense as a percentage of direct grants approved  6.7%  4.1% 5.1%  4.5%  5.4% 
 4. Research, Policy, Development, Information and Support  4.1 Research, policy development, information and support expense as a percentage of direct grants approved  5.7% 3.9% 5.1%  4.5%  5.4% 
 5. Corporate and Asset and Infrastructure Support to the Culture and Arts Portfolio and Government  5.1 Average cost of service per full time equivalent  $171,457  $138,820  $246,636  $15,975  $319,290
 17. Licensing - Evaluation and Determination of Applications  17.1 Average cost of determining applications  $554  $460  $476  $430  $490
 18. Compliance Audits and Inspections  18.1 Average cost of conducting inspections  $995  $961  $759  $893  $804
 19. Industry Leadership and Infrastructure Development  19.1 Average cost of providing consultancy (policy, advocacy and infrastructure) to organisations  $10,083  $10,874  $10,080  $10,324  $13,447
 19.2 Average cost of providing the contact services (policy, advocacy and infrastructure)
 $526  $740  $670  $942  $2,893
 19.3 Average cost to manage infrastructure grants  $3,288  $2,114  $2,545  $2,175  $2,451
 20. Building Capacity and Participation  20.1 Average cost of providing consultancy
(organisational development and participation) to organisations
 $13,554  $15,523  $13,565  $18,080  $11,413
 20.2 Average cost of providing the contact services (organisational development and participation)  $309  $413  $344  $587  $789
 20.3 Average cost
to manage sport and recreation development grants 
 $2,002  $1,893  $2,026  $2,739  $1,990
   21.1 Average cost per bed night  $57  $53  $55  $54  $64
 21.2 Average cost per participation  $24  $24  $25  $27  $27

Changes to the outcome-based management framework

A number of changes were made to the DLGSC’s Outcomes Based Management Framework during the 2018-2019 year. These changes were made as a result of the annual audit by the Office of Auditor General (OAG), which resulted in a qualified audit.
Findings from the audit impacted on both the State information management and archival service, as well as the compliance audits and inspections service. 

State information management and archival service

The department had not been able to reliably measure the State information and archival service key efficiency indicator, Cost Per Access Service and elected not to report the KPIs in the 2017-2018 reporting period. As a result, in 2017-2018 the department did not comply with the requirement under Treasurer’s Instruction TI904 and report on Under Treasurer’s approved KPIs.

As a result of the Machinery of Government changes and the review of the department’s Outcome Based Management Framework process it was recommended that the State Information Management and Archival service indicators would no longer convey a meaningful understanding of the agency’s overall performance.

 
The State Information Management and Archival service was removed from the department’s Outcomes Based Management Framework effective 2018-2019 year.
 

Compliance audits and inspections

This indicator was previously reported as ‘Licensees/service providers that comply with audit requirements and statutory criteria’, it was recommended to amend it to ensure it reflects what is being measured. This indicator is amended to ‘Percentage of audit and inspections that comply with requirements and statutory criteria’ and is effective as of the 2018-2019 year. 

Arts industry support

As par to the Outcomes Based Management (OBM) framework review, it has been identified that the following indicators do not meet the audit requirements as the reported figures cannot be validated. 

  • Number of department funded works presented or developed (annually); and
  • Number of paid attendances to funded organisations. 
Accordingly, these measures have been removed for the 2018-19 reporting period and will not continue under the new OBM framework. These will be replaced with measures that better reflect the role undertaken by the department.

Shared responsibilities

The DLGSC works with all tiers of government to achieve State Government outcomes that will benefit the Western Australian community. 

In partnership with the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, the DLGSC funds four Major Performing Arts (MPA) companies in WA. This is part of a national approach to secure high-level outcomes from the MPA sector. Through this partnership, funding is also provided to the visual arts and craft sector. This is a nationally coordinated joint package of funding and support for the Australian contemporary visual arts sector; to promote the creative work by living visual artists and craft practitioners, and the organisations that support their practice.

Screenwest delivers the Western Australian Regional Film Fund in partnership with the DLGSC and Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development. This Fund encourages regional film industry activity, builds local capacity, and contributes to the liveability and vibrancy of regional WA communities.

As part of the Jobs and Economic Diversification (JED) Cabinet Sub-committee, which provides the governance for the implementation of the Government’s Plan for Jobs and engages with industry groups and the community, the DLGSC helps to oversee agency implementation of the JED policy goals and priorities.

In partnership with the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, the DLGSC delivers several Royalties for Regions funded programs. These programs included delivering the final year of the Royalties for Regions-funded Creative Regions program, which included supporting regional performing arts and visual arts venues, and Aboriginal art centres. Another example is the Regional Athlete Support Program Royalties for Regions funding, which was provided to assist in the delivery of a high-quality daily training environment for regional athletes. This included coaching and sport specialist services within regional locations.

The department works in close partnership with the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions to develop trails strategies, infrastructure and participation. This relationship has resulted in the development of the Trails Development Series and the awarding of the $10.0 million Collie Adventure Trails project.

The department works closely with the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage to support better planning, sustainability and vibrancy of WA communities. Three key projects include: the introduction of the new Heritage Act 2018; the alignment of the planning reform agenda with the review of the Local Government Act 1995, and the identification and provision of State owned-land to fast track the establishment of additional residential aged care development facilities, through the State Aged Care Availability Working Group. 

Resource agreement

The Resource Agreement articulates the department’s desired outcomes (both financial and non-financial) and performance targets as stated in the Budget Papers, and is consistent with the broader strategic policy direction and priorities of the government. The department’s Resource Agreement is signed by the Accountable Authority, the Treasurer, and the following responsible Ministers under Part 3, Division 5 of the Financial Management Act 2006:

  • Minister for Local Government; Culture and the Arts
  • Minister for Racing and Gaming; Citizenship and Multicultural Interests
  • Minister for Sport and Recreation
  • Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

The targets identified in the Resource Agreement relate only to the department. The targets published in the Budget Papers for the culture and the arts statutory authorities are subject to separate resource agreements.

Agency performance

Key achievements

Regulation and support of local government

The department supports local governments to fulfil their statutory obligations and to improve capability in the sector
 
The department provides advice and support across the local government sector and uses a risk-based approach to identify those needing targeted intervention and assistance. The department supports the sector in the provision of good governance and compliance by monitoring, promoting and enforcing compliance with the Local Government Act 1995. The department reviews and administers a range of legislation impacting on local governments and the community. Through the provision of regulatory functions primarily related to the administration of the Local Government Act 1995 including approvals, compliance monitoring and other statutory support, the department assists local governments with best practice in the sector. The department is responsible for managing the State Local Government Partnership Agreement and the management of the Committee of Perth in accordance with the City of Perth Act 2016.

Key achievements
Legislative reform – suspension and dismissal powers
The Local Government Amendment (Suspension and Dismissal) Act, which amended the Local Government Act 1995 came into effect from 20 November 2018. These changes protect the public interest and the system of local government by facilitating a timely intervention by the Minister when a local government is unable to carry out its functions.
 
This legislative reform provides the Minister for Local Government with additional powers enabling tailored assistance to be given to a council member or a council. Specifically, the Minister has the power to suspend and/or order an individual council member to undertake remedial action when the Minister is satisfied that it is inappropriate for the council member to continue to act as a member of council without intervention.
Local Government Act reform
The first phase of local government reform saw the passage of the Local Government Legislation Amendment Act 2019 on 27 June 2019. This Act introduced universal training for elected members, including candidate induction, essentials training for newly elected councillors and ongoing professional development.  
 
It also introduced a new gifts framework, best practice standards for CEO recruitment, performance review and early termination, a new code of conduct and greater transparency with a wide range of information being required to be published on local government websites.
 
The second phase, which will underpin a new Local Government Act, involved DLGSC officers conducting more than 110 workshops and forums around the State. More than 3,150 submissions were subsequently received.
Stop puppy farming
Feedback on the stop puppy farming proposals were sought between 3 May 2018 and 3 August 2018. A summary consultation report was subsequently released and provides a snapshot of 4,754 submissions received during the consultation period.  
Dog and Cat Act reviews
The Dog Amendment Act 2013 and Cat Act 2011 came into effect in 2013. Both Acts are now being reviewed to see how effective the changes have been in the control and management of dogs and cats in Western Australia. 
 
The department has released a consultation paper to gather feedback from the community, local governments and stakeholders about how the 2013 changes are working, whether they have been effective, and to identify any areas that could be improved. 
State Local Government Partnership Agreement
Signed in 2017, the Agreement is an ongoing engagement mechanism between the State Government and local government to discuss and address issues of mutual interest. The Agreement Leadership Group meets twice a calendar year and in 2018/2019 a Directors General Working Group was established to progress the implementation of an agreed work plan.
Support for local government
In February 2019 Local Government Professionals WA was funded by the department to expand the Peer Support Program into regional local government areas. The purpose of the program is to facilitate meaningful peer support to participating local governments to help improve the content and performance of their Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) framework through regional collaboration and resource sharing. The program has been widely promoted with interest from across the State. The South West group of local governments (11 in total) has been successful with a proposal requesting to establish their own peer support program in the region.
 
The department held an interactive IPR Capacity Building Forum aimed to demonstrate a multitude of simple and effective ideas to assist local governments in meeting their IPR requirements, which was attended by 60 metropolitan and regional local government representatives. The focus of the forum was on the importance of peer support – the benefits as well as efficiencies through local governments working together. 
 
The department and Local Government Professionals WA partner in a CEO Support Program that assists Local Government CEOs to be better equipped to deal with the challenges currently facing the sector. In 2018-2019, the program included: 24 local government CEOs who participated in coaching and mentoring; 35 CEOs who attended the Connections forums; and 27 local government staff who attended the executive leadership training.

Promotion and support of multiculturalism

Through the development and implementation of policies, programs and services, the department aims to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism
 
Western Australia is one of the most culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse states in Australia, with 32% of the population born overseas. The State is home to people from 190 countries, speaking 240 languages and dialects, including Indigenous languages, and following 100 faiths.
 
The Office of Multicultural Interests works to achieve the full potential of multiculturalism in WA. This requires strategies that include the whole community, including business and industry groups, government and non-government agencies, culturally diverse communities and the wider community.

Key achievements
Harmony Week 
In the lead up to Harmony Week 2019, the department encouraged counterparts across Australia to join with WA in celebrating Harmony Week rather than Harmony Day; as there were community concerns about celebrating an anniversary that is reserved internationally for sombre reflection. In February, as a result of the department’s efforts, the Department of Home Affairs confirmed that they officially renamed their initiative Harmony Week. As a result, Harmony Week is now marked consistently across Australia. 
 
To mark Harmony Week 2019, the department held the third annual Harmony Week schools debate featuring students from WA universities debating the question: ‘Australia is the most successfully multicultural country in the world’. The debate was attended by 250 high school students from across the Perth metropolitan areas as well as being live-streamed, where it was viewed by a further 300 people. 
Perth Chung Wah Cultural Festival 
In May 2019, the department, Small Business Development Corporation, Tourism WA and Burswood Park worked with the Chung Wah Association to deliver the inaugural Perth Chung Wah Cultural Festival. Funded through the Burswood Park Board, the festival sought to: celebrate the WA Chinese community’s sporting and cultural heritage; showcase WA as an exciting and desirable tourist destination; create a platform to increase national and international visitor numbers to WA; and activate and promote Burswood Park. Around 20,000 people attended the week-long festival, including 32 international guests. 
Community Grants Program review 
In 2018, the department implemented a new model for its Community Grants Program. This included new categories and a change from scheduled funding rounds to funding being available all year. Community groups are supported by departmental staff to develop their ideas and applications. This new model has seen an increased number of grants going directly to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) communities. 
 
The review included a change to the eligibility criteria to ensure that funding reaches activities led by CaLD communities. A recruitment process was undertaken to select community members to participate in Community Grants Program panels. This has provided a broad range of skills, experience and perspective to the panel assessment process and has served as a capacity building exercise for community members who want to learn more about government funding processes.
Community Language Teacher Awards
 In November 2018, the department launched the inaugural Community Language Teachers Awards in partnership with Community Languages WA. Russian language teacher Irina Yakimenko was awarded the Outstanding Community Language Teacher of the year, with a further 14 teachers receiving certificates on commendation. 
Leadership and Governance Program
In 2018, 19 new graduates joined an alumni of more than 93 CaLD professionals who have completed the department’s Leadership and Governance Program. The Program encourages diversity at board level and supports OnBoard WA, a government initiative to connect people with WA public sector board opportunities. The graduates come from a wide range of professions including business, human services and engineering. They are all experts in their field and ready to contribute their experience to public, private and not-for-profit boards and committees. 
Languages Week
In 2018, the department partnered with the WA Museum to deliver the Four Words project, which explored the personal meaning languages have for 11 Western Australians who speak a language other than English. The videos were shown on public screens throughout Perth and were accompanied by a learning resource for teachers and parents to promote language learning. 
 
Also during Languages Week, as part of a partnership with the department, the State Library of Western Australia presented the Sharing Our Diverse Heritage project. The 12-month project involved the identification, collection and processing of heritage materials that document the lives and stories of Asian and European migrants in Western Australia. Resources and teaching materials were also developed for the use by language teachers, and a new visual display was created to complement the Community Languages Collection at the State Library.
Pathways to Improvement Program
In 2018, the department launched the Pathways to Improvement Program, a school development program for community language schools. The Program aims to support school administration and operations and develop quality language teaching. It is intended that the program will streamline application processes for Community Language School grants and take a practical approach to the development of community language schools in Western Australia.

Arts industry support

The department supports the delivery of arts and culture activities across Western Australia through funding programs and partnerships
 
In 2018-2019 the department distributed more than $30 million in funding to bring a vibrant mix of arts and culture to Western Australian audiences. This included $19 million to non-government organisations, over $3 million awarded to individuals, groups and organisations through project grants, $4.9 million in Royalties for Regions funding distributed through the Creative Regions grants programs, the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost and $3 million to Screenwest. 

Key achievements
Creative Regions
In the final year of the Royalties for Regions-funded Creative Regions Program, the program was reviewed by KPMG. The review found clear alignment between the schemes, project and overall program objectives. It noted that its delivery was underpinned by a collaborative, staged and flexible approach, and stakeholders reported that the program provided the support that was needed, and largely at a high quality.  
 
The program delivered support to a range of regional arts and cultural activity. Aboriginal art centres were strengthened through Future Focus funding, regional performing arts touring was supported by the Regional and Remote Touring Fund, and regional arts venues were upgraded through the Regional Venue Improvement Fund. 
As part of the Creative Regions Program, Circuit West delivered the WA Showcase May 2019. Thirty-eight shows were presented at the event, 20 of which are now being investigated for touring.
Contemporary Music Fund (CMF)
The State Government has provided funding of $3 million over four years for the CMF to support the music industry in WA. As part of the CMF, the CMF Grant Program commenced in January 2019 with 38 successful applications. In addition, support was provided to the following targeted initiatives: Safer Venues, Girl’s Rock, WAM Regional Recording Programs and WAMCon. This was also a successfully implemented election commitment.
Revealed
Revealed 2019 was an overwhelming success, growing on the 2018 achievements across all four streams of the program, which included: an exhibition, professional development program, public symposium and a marketplace event. The exhibition featured approximately 120 emerging Aboriginal artists from the State; representing a 34% increase from the previous year. In 2019, Revealed was experienced by 22,681 people, a 72% increase from 2018, and generated $619,235 in sales, a 22% increase. Sales from this year’s event makes up almost 30% of the total revenue generated by Revealed in its 11-year history. This growth demonstrates the enormous appetite and demand for authentic Aboriginal art.
Virtual Reality Festival
The department launched the first virtual reality film festival, to be held in July 2019. Titled XR:WA, the Festival will present public and industry events that explore virtual and augmented reality, artificial intelligence, computer animations and other forms of screen-based and immersive media. This was also a successfully implemented election commitment.
Regional Exhibition Touring Boost
Funded through Royalties for Regions, the Regional Exhibition Touring Boost increases the number of visual arts exhibitions in the regions and increases regional access to the State Art Collection. In conjunction with key delivery partners ART ON THE MOVE and the Art Gallery of Western Australia, the first of a series of exhibitions opened at the Katanning Library and Art Gallery in April 2019 and will tour to six other regional venues. It is the first time in 20 years that works from the State Art Collection have toured to regional WA. This was also a successfully implemented election commitment.
Sunset Precinct
In 2018, Cabinet approved the transfer of the Sunset Heritage Precinct to the Minister for Culture and the Arts and after 24 years the former public hospital has now been set aside for arts, cultural, community and ancillary commercial uses.
In February 2019, after an upgrade of the P Block (Perth’s second oldest picture theatre) Perth Festival launched their 2019 season with Strut Dance.
 
In keeping with the State Government’s vision for the precinct, an Expression of Interest seeking an appropriately credentialed organisation to invest in Sunset Heritage Precinct was released in February 2019. This resulted in the invitation to three Western Australian organisations to submit proposals.

Research, policy development, information and support

The department contributes to the development of the State by delivering strong evidence-based culture and the arts policy, research and planning to achieve State Government outcomes
 
The department undertakes the development and implementation of research and industry projects to strengthen the policy basis of its programs and services. 
 
Working with a range of stakeholders and partners, the department provides information and opportunities to foster knowledge growth, connections and access to industry intelligence. This may include statistics on cultural funding, employment, attendance and participation, and WA’s values and attitudes towards culture and the arts.

Key achievements
WA Cultural Infrastructure Strategy consultation
Key stakeholder consultation on the draft WA Cultural Infrastructure Strategy took place from June 2018 to March 2019. Consultants were engaged in the Kimberley, Pilbara, Mid-West, and Perth to undertake interviews and workshops with Aboriginal key stakeholders; gathering feedback from 116 stakeholders in total. A consultant was engaged to facilitate three workshops in Perth, attended by 136 stakeholders. A State-wide online survey gathered feedback from 149 respondents. Two live webinars were held to engage 38 regional stakeholders in conversation, and two live webinars were conducted in partnership with the Western Australian Local Government Association to engage 14 local governments. Thirty-three written submissions were also received, making a total of 486 key stakeholder engagements with the draft Strategy overall.
Culture Counts
The department and the City of Perth received the ‘Best Practice in Public Sector Evaluation’ 2019 Achievement Award from the Institute of Public Administration Australia WA. The Award was received for the shared outcomes evaluations initiative, using the Culture Counts system to improve processes around outcome measurement and reporting for organisations receiving funding from different levels of government. 
 
The department developed the Culture Counts system with Pracsys in a public private partnership. This WA system has progressed quickly with the support of the sector and a growing national and international reputation. In the United Kingdom, Arts Council England has selected Culture Counts and its UK partner Counting What Counts Ltd to provide the service for their new impact and insight toolkit.
Arts Organisation Investment Program
The Arts Organisation Investment Program, the department’s multiyear arts organisations grant program, was refined in response to sector consultation undertaken in 2018-2019 and resulted in a streamlined application process. It was based on the two new categories of ‘producing-presenting organisations’ and ‘service organisations’ and was more clearly aligned with the State Government’s objectives. The objective of the program is to invest in a portfolio of small to medium organisations that collectively create and present high-quality arts, cultural and creative experiences that reflect the State’s identity through telling WA stories. Applications to the program closed in May 2019 for activity commencing after January 2020.
Silk Road Culture Tour
The department hosted the Silk Road Culture Tour, a world touring exhibition presented by the National Base for International Cultural Exchange and Research China and the International Institute of Cultural Studies in Shanghai. The exhibition of 46 artworks was shown at the Perth Concert Hall in March, which coincided with the launch of the WASO 2019 performance season. The department hosted a delegation of 19 artists, curators and arts administrators from Shanghai in Perth during the first week of the exhibition and showcased Western Australian’s own creative talent, Aboriginal culture and stunning landscapes.
Creative Industries Consortium
In May 2019, the Minister for Culture and the Arts hosted and presented the ‘Creative Industries Consortium’ with industry stakeholders and the Minister for Innovation and ICT; Science. The first consortium meeting in 2017 involved a broad cross-section of the creative industries. This second meeting concentrated on creative work that has a strong digital technology focus and is often highly interactive. This includes the production of video games for entertainment; eSports, an audience viewing gameplay at a live event or on a screen; as well as art collections, theatre, film, television, music and storytelling delivered through new technology such as immersive and augmented reality. The consortium was a success and continued to strengthen the working relationship between industry and the State Government, while seeking expert advice on the challenges and issues faced by the sector. It identified initiatives to grow the State’s creative industries, which use new technologies to tell Western Australian stories to the world, drive innovation in other industries, and promote positive social outcomes. 

Corporate and asset and infrastructure support

The department manages cultural infrastructure on behalf of the Government of Western Australia and provides centralised services to the Culture and Arts portfolio and other agencies 
 
The department also provides strategic policy, leadership and funding support to local government to promote and guide the development of sport and recreation infrastructure.
 
The department delivers the Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund, State Sporting Infrastructure Fund and a range of infrastructure related election commitments. 

Key achievements
His Majesty’s Theatre refurbishment
The department continued project delivery of the $6.5 million refurbishment of His Majesty’s Theatre to maintain the world-class venue for opera, dance and theatre. During 2018-2019, an orchestra pit lift to improve occupational health and safety was installed; replacing the previous pit, which needed to be opened and closed manually. The new lift enables the floor to be automatically moved between the pit and auditorium levels.
 
During 2018-2019, planning for the second stage of the refurbishment commenced, which will see improvements to His Majesty’s Theatre’s public areas; providing more hospitality opportunities and upgrades of the foyer areas. The upgrades will assist in conserving the Theatre’s cultural significance, and enhancing the conservation and preservation of the iconic building in the Perth central business district.
Elevate
The department is progressing this election commitment and working with the Art Gallery of Western Australia to develop a business case that provides the proposed design and cost of the $10 million redevelopment of the Art Gallery rooftop as a regular cultural and commercial venue. 
Local Projects, Local Jobs
Delivered across culture and the arts, infrastructure, Office of Multicultural Interests and sport and recreation business areas, the department continued with the delivery of 251 Local Projects, Local Jobs funding agreements to the value of $13.9 million.
New museum project
The department is working closely with the Western Australian Museum and the Department of Finance to deliver the $400 million new museum project. Developed in the heart of the Perth Cultural Centre, it will share the stories of our people and place; acting as a gateway to explore all of Western Australia. It will reflect the extraordinary history, distinctiveness, creativity and diversity of our State and region.
Asset maintenance program
The department manages maintenance of 65 buildings that support the delivery of cultural services. These buildings are in Perth, Fremantle, Geraldton, Kalgoorlie and Albany and the majority are heritage listed. The buildings are used for various purposes including the exhibition and safe storage of the State’s collections of cultural material, performing arts, conservation and research.
The department also manages some of the services contracts such as utilities, making savings through larger volume centrally managed contracts and investment in new technology. Reducing the cost of operations is an important contribution to the financial viability of the sector.
Relocation of the West Australian Football Commission (WAFC) to Tuart College
In June 2017, the State Government announced that it would construct the Bob Hawke College at Kitchener Park, adjacent to Subiaco Oval, to be open for Year 7 students in 2020.
 
In October 2018, Cabinet approved an amount of $2.2 million being provided to the department to undertake works at Tuart College to facilitate the relocation of the WAFC. The department worked with the WAFC and Building Management and Works to deliver upgrades to Tuart College to allow the WAFC’s relocation from Subiaco Oval, facilitating its redevelopment, with removal of hazardous material and demolition to occur ahead of the opening of the Bob Hawke College.
WA Motorsport Strategy
A motorsport strategy for Western Australia to guide planning, future and current investment decisions and appropriate governance and management structures is currently underway. The broad objectives of developing a motorsport strategy are: to identify the infrastructure needs of road track-based motorsport activities; develop a hierarchy of motorsport facilities from State level (Wanneroo Raceway), regional level and district/local level of functionality and catchment; identify appropriate governance and management structures; and ensure facilities are complementary.
Review of the State Sporting Infrastructure Plan
The State Sporting Infrastructure Plan, which serves as a blueprint for the provision of State, national and international level sporting infrastructure in Western Australia, was reviewed. The Plan provides the State Government with a proactive approach to planning and guides the government’s investment in sporting infrastructure in relation to new capital projects and ongoing maintenance and upgrades. 
State Sporting Infrastructure Fund (SSIF)
The SSIF traditionally provides funding for State sporting facilities managed and/or operated by State Sporting Associations in relation to planning, ongoing maintenance and upgrades that are less than $10 million. Projects over $10 million in value proceeded through the Department of Treasury’s Strategic Asset Management Framework and the budget process.  
Projects proposed for funding are identified and prioritised through the State Sporting Infrastructure Plan, by completing strategic asset maintenance plans for respective State sporting facilities and through the department’s strategic asset planning process. In 2018-2019, the SSIF allocation was $1.891 million, which funded 12 planning projects and 10 capital projects.
State Sporting Infrastructure business cases
During 2018-2019 the department progressed business cases for the State Tennis Centre, State Football Centre, Midvale SpeedDome, State Squash Centre and the State Hockey Centre.
Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF)
The $12 million CSRFF provides financial assistance to community groups and local government authorities to develop basic infrastructure for sport and recreation. The program aims to increase participation in sport and recreation, with an emphasis on physical activity, through rational development of sustainable, good quality, well designed and well-utilised facilities. There were 60 projects approved for 2018-2019 worth $12,072,017.

Licensing – evaluation and determination of applications

The department receives, processes and determines applications in accordance with the legislation
 
The department provides a licensing service for the liquor and gambling industries.  Applications are considered and determined on their merits in accordance with the relevant legislative requirements.
 
Applications related to the liquor industry are evaluated and determined by the Director of Liquor Licensing or appointed delegate and applications related to the gambling industry are evaluated and determined by the department on behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission. The department receives a service fee from the Gaming and Wagering Commission for assessing applications for the gambling industry.
 
On behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission the department enables community and sporting clubs to fundraise through community gaming activities. During 2018-2019, the department approved community gaming activities that raised $74 million; with $28 million being returned to beneficiary organisations.

Key achievements
Liquor reform
In 2018, new liquor licensing laws were introduced to support the hospitality industry by reducing regulatory burden on licensees and liberalising laws to give greater choice to consumers and visitors. Major amendments include:
  • Adding a new public interest assessment category to enable a venue’s tourism, community and cultural benefits to be considered and allowing the chief executive officer appointed under the Western Australian Tourism Commission Act 1983 to intervene and make representations in proceedings before the Director of Liquor Licensing;
  • Providing the licensing authority with the discretion to consider low risk applications without having regard to the public interest assessment requirements;
  • Greater flexibility for existing and established licensees to host pop-up bars at short-term events;
  • Amending the objects of the Act to include responsible practices in the promotion, sale, supply and consumption of liquor;
  • Establishing a separate licence category for small bars;
  • Doubling the duration of some Extended Trading Permits;
  • Making it easier for restaurants with a limit of 120 patrons to obtain a permit to serve liquor without a meal; and
  • Allowing customers of small bars or taverns to take-home partially-consumed wine, which previously only applied to restaurants.
Another initiative has seen the Director of Liquor Licensing issue an order under section 31 of the Liquor Control Act 1988 to allow liquor stores in regional Western Australia to trade on Sundays on long weekends. This arrangement removes the need for the licensees to apply for an extended trading permit to trade on these weekends.
 
The department has also been working on streamlining approvals processes to save industry time and has further developed the online lodgement system with many applications now able to be lodged online. This should result in a reduction in duplication in information requests and applicants will be able to monitor the progress of their applications online and respond more easily to requests for information.
Banned Drinkers Register
The department is currently working with the liquor industry to assess the feasibility and implementation of a Banned Drinkers Register (BDR) trial in the Pilbara region. The proposal incorporates an electronic system designed to identify persons who are not permitted to purchase liquor and notifies the licensee accordingly e.g. red light or green light. The trial is intended to provide benefits including better targeting of individuals who abuse alcohol to access support services, informing licensees where barring or prohibitions are in place and as a complementary measure to other harm reduction strategies.
 
Licensees in the trial area will participate on a voluntary basis and funding for the proposal will be sourced by industry. The trial will be conducted over a two-year period under current legislative provisions and an evaluation of its effectiveness will be conducted at its conclusion. The trial is expected to commence in the 2019 calendar year.
Point of Consumption Tax
A point of consumption tax was introduced on 1 January 2019 to replace the tax regime that previously applied to wagering in Western Australia. As well as simplifying wagering taxes, the new tax regime ensures online wagering operators pay tax on wagering conducted in Western Australia.
 
Under the new regime, 30% of point of consumption tax revenue will be returned to the Western Australian racing industry as well as a $13 million contribution to the Sports Wagering Account from 2018-2019 to 2021-2022 to provide greater certainty of funding available to community sport and recreation through the Sports Wagering Account.
Gambling legislation
The passage of the Gaming and Wagering Legislation Amendment Act 2018 in December 2018 saw the implementation of the government’s policy of supporting a strong and sustainable racing industry and responsible gambling practices in Western Australia. Major amendments included giving the Gaming and Wagering Commission the ability to prescribe undesirable wagering products as prohibited events or contingencies; amending the definition of ‘bet backs’ for bookmakers; and expanding the powers of the Gaming and Wagering Commission to formulate and impose prohibitions or conditions in relation to the advertising of live odds during events.
Gambling CEOs conference
In May 2019, the department hosted the 2019 Australasian Casino and Gaming Regulators CEO Forum and Conference. The theme of the conference was ‘Tackling change in an evolving world’.
 
The CEOs and Commissioners forum and the Board and Committee Members meetings were held at Rottnest Island and attendees were provided with a tour of the island. The conference was held in Fremantle and brought together nearly 50 CEOs and senior executives representing liquor and gaming industry regulators from Singapore, New Zealand and all jurisdictions within Australia.
Gaming Community Trust Grants
The Gaming Community Trust is credited with funds derived from unclaimed winnings from Crown casino and community gaming and the Trust makes recommendations to the Minister for Racing and Gaming for grants that will benefit the community.  
The Minister approved a grant of $100,000 to the Showgrounds Community Men’s Shed to go towards the cost of refurbishing the Shed, which will be equipped with various woodworking machines, tools and other equipment such as computers and a meeting room facility.
 
The Perth Rowing Club was successful in its application for $17,040 to go towards purchasing a new VIII rowing boat. The purchase of the boat overcomes the club’s reliance on loan boats and will allow members to enter into competitive local, national and international events.
 
Feed the Little Children was also successful in its application for $47,368 to purchase a new vehicle to assist in delivering food to disadvantaged children and families in Broome. The organisation required an additional vehicle to meet the demands of the service without volunteers needing to use their own private vehicles.

Compliance audits and inspections

The department performs audits and inspections to verify that the provision of gambling and liquor is conducted in a responsible and lawful manner
 
Under the legislative framework provided in the Liquor Control Act 1988, the department undertakes regular audits and inspections to regulate the sale, supply and consumption of liquor, and to minimise harm and ill-health to the public. Additionally, inspections are undertaken to ensure that licensed premises are being operated and maintained to a standard that meets consumer expectations. 
 
On behalf of the Gaming and Wagering Commission, the department undertakes audits and inspections to regulate the lawful conduct of gambling activities that are permitted under the Betting Control Act 1954, the Casino Control Act 1984, the Gaming and Wagering Commission Act 1987 and the Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003.

Key achievements
Inspections
The department conducted a total of 9,824 inspections during 2018-2019; with only 309 instances of non-compliance. The low level of non-compliance, that being 3%, indicates that the monitoring and enforcement of responsible and lawful gambling and liquor services is in accordance with the relevant legislation, further demonstrating the effectiveness of the department’s enforcement programs.  
 
Areas of non-compliance in the 3% typically include conducting activities without a valid permit or licence or breaching conditions of permits.
Compliance and education programs
Through a robust and targeted compliance program the standards of licensed premises are monitored with the majority of licensees effectively meeting regulatory requirements. The continued education of existing and new licensees in terms of the requirements (and recent amendments) of the Liquor Control Act 1988 ensures the premises are operating and maintained to a standard that meets community expectations.

Sport and recreation industry leadership and development

The department provides strategic leadership and support for the sport and recreation industry across Western Australia
 
This is achieved through funding, resources and advice to State sporting organisations, community organisations and local governments. The department proactively engages with the sector to determine and implement strategic responses to current and emerging issues and to review the department’s programs and services. 
 
Built (including playing fields, recreation centres, trails, etc.) and natural (outdoor) spaces form the settings in which sport and active recreation occurs. Availability and accessibility of these settings contribute to participation and achievement.

Key achievements
Women in leadership
The State Government established a target of 50% representation of women on executive boards and committees of State governing bodies. The department has provided support for sport and recreation industry organisations to achieve this target and address the gender diversity imbalance in leadership positions. This support included the establishment of the Gender Diversity Advisory Group, delivery of governance training and the development of the Gender Diversity Case for Change Report outlining the economic, cultural and social benefits realised when a more balanced leadership structure is implemented.
Strategic Funding Review
In March 2018, a Strategic Funding Review of the Western Australian sport and recreation industry was initiated. The review involved considerable industry consultation over the past 14 months. It aims to ensure funding decisions will be objective and fair, and there will be increased transparency in the decision-making process. It also examined areas for improvement in how the department conducts business to simplify its requirements and reduce the administrative burden on smaller community organisations. The review contains 22 findings and 12 recommendations and focusses on ensuring the department’s funding programs are effective in supporting the industry.

Sport and recreation building capacity and participation

The department provides support for organisations and personnel delivering sport and recreation State-wide from participation to the elite level through advice and funding support
 
Participation in sport and active recreation contributes to mental and physical well-being and the development of strong networks and support structures within the community. The department works with the industry to support athletes and teams to achieve at all levels, including local, national and international competitions. 
 
By building on the existing capabilities of individuals and organisations, the department enables them to operate at their best and provide quality opportunities for participation in sport and recreation.

Key achievements
Asian Engagement Sports Funding Program
The Asian Engagement Sports Funding Program is supporting the delivery of the State Asian Engagement Strategy through the attraction of business and visitors to Western Australia to support local jobs and economy. Funding provided to State sporting associations assists in furthering their engagement within Asian markets and in showcasing the State as a location for sporting development and travel. 
Targeted Participation Program partnership with Healthway
In 2018-2019, the department partnered with Healthway to deliver the Targeted Participation Program. The program provided over $1 million in funding to State sporting organisations, community organisations and local governments to promote participation, healthy lifestyles and engagement in sport and active recreation to evidence-based low participation groups across Western Australia. In 2018-2019, the program provided 39 organisations with funding to deliver programs and services to the target audiences across the State.
KidSport
The department has been working with local governments and the community to continue to deliver a streamlined, consistent and accessible KidSport program, which in 2018-2019 delivered almost $3.5 million distributed through 25,368 vouchers. Over 15% of these vouchers were distributed to those identifying as being from the Aboriginal community (3,830 vouchers) and a further 1,445 vouchers assisted people with a disability to engage in club sport. Since inception, KidSport has provided vouchers to over 86,000 unique sport playing recipients.
 
Alongside the implementation of an updated KidSport policy and procedures, the department has also collaborated with the Pilbara and Kimberley communities to deliver the CONNECT Kids pilot program. This pilot program is assisting kids through the support of local community groups, to connect with club sport opportunities in these regions.
WA Trails 
The department leads the State’s Trails Reference Group to implement the recommendations identified in the WA Strategic Trails Blueprint. The blueprint has been the foundation for collaboration with other agencies to obtain major funding commitments for trails development in Dwellingup and Collie. The department has worked closely with the communities and business leaders in both towns to prepare these regions on the requirements of a being Trail Town.
 
The department provides State-wide forums for the consultation and development of trail plans to assist in addressing local challenges. The Trails Development Series has been prepared to support the understanding and implementation of the 8-stage trail development process, and to ensure the delivery of high-quality trails across the State.
Steppingstone to Sport, a Pathway to Physical Activity
The department, through its Pilbara Office, in partnership with WA Centre for Rural Health, funded $15,000 towards the West Pilbara Physical Activity and Fundamental Movement Skills Pilot Program. Partnering with four community service organisations and Curtin and UWA students, the eight-week program has been designed and a pilot delivery session held building local capacity with six play group coordinators covering up to 80 children across the four locations. The pilot will continue in 2019-2020.
Mid-West Outdoor Recreation Strategy
The Mid West Outdoor Recreation Strategy moved to the implementation stage in 2018-2019. The priority projects were:
  • Pathways to Participation – The completion of the Chapman River Mountain Bike facility.
  • Trails Development – A partnership with the Shire of Mingenew to undertake a North Midlands Trails Masterplan project.
  • Wind and Water – The activation of a Wind and Water cluster, which has developed strategic partnerships and memberships.
  • Cycle Friendly Communities – The department has been included in the development of the City of Greater Geraldton Cycling Plan to 2050.
  • Outdoor Recreation Events – The department supported and funded a number of regional recreation events including hosting 2018 Kite Surfing National Championships at Coronation Beach. Other events supported included the Kalbarri Adventurethon, Geraldton Wind on Water Festival, Port Denison Windfest and Geraldton SUPfest.
Peel Mental Health Project 
The department contributed $10,000 to funding a mental health training program in partnership with Youth Focus and Alcoa for the Young Men’s Project. This training was delivered to sporting clubs in the Peel region to increase education and awareness of mental health issues to the sporting community and assist in reducing the rate of youth suicide in the region. Expressions of Interest were received from 14 clubs within the City of Mandurah, Shire of Murray and City of Rockingham.

Training was delivered to six clubs in 2018-2019; with further training being delivered to clubs using remaining funds in July-December 2019.
South West/Peel – Seniors Activation program 
The department, through its South West office, administered a funding program that could be accessed by local governments that may not have a functional recreation centre but want to activate the seniors age group. This year’s funding saw five local governments successfully apply for $3,000 each to deliver a high-quality activation service to over 125 seniors in the Peel/South West region. An example of diversity of the program is the Golden Giselle’s Ballet classes run by the Shire of Harvey. This program attracted over 45 women participants to ballet classes across two programs in Harvey and Australind.

Recreation camps management

The department provides experiential outdoor activities to the Western Australian community through the management of recreation camps 
 
The department’s sport and recreation camps are a successful community service operation delivering quality, affordable, accessible camp experiences in Western Australia. There are four metropolitan locations: Bickley (Orange Grove), Ern Halliday (Hillarys), Point Walter (Bicton), Woodman Point (Coogee) and one regional location at Camp Quaranup (Albany).
Since the initial capital improvements in 2007, the recreation camps have generated $45 million in earnings, that has been re-invested to improve the experiences offered at the camps. This has provided a social dividend in excess of 2 million physical activity hours for the WA community.

Key achievements
The department’s recreation camps supported 1,169 unique camp bookings servicing 83,282 bed nights and 144,287 instructor led activity participations. This equates to more than 215,000 physical activity hours predominantly in adventure recreation programming.
Community participation
The December 2018 Woodman Point Recreation Camp Community Open Day commemorated the 100-year anniversary of the HMAT Boonah Tragedy and provided an opportunity for the local community to visit and understand the operations of this camp. Some 1,000 visitors attended the event co-hosted with the Friends of Woodman Point Recreation Camp (FOWPRC). Earlier in the year, the camp also hosted the launch of ‘Western Sentinel: A History of Woodman Point Quarantine Station’ by Ian Darroch, also supported by FOWPRC.
 
Close to 1,000 people enjoyed the music performances and active recreation offered at Bickley Outdoor Recreation Camp on its third Community Open Day held 7 April 2019. South East Regional Centre for Urban Landcare (SERCUL) provided an interactive display supporting environmental engagement and the event was supported by a diversity of local volunteers from scouts to fire and emergency services.
 
Holiday programs were delivered through the Ern Halliday and Bickley camp sites with a slight decrease in participants (466 down in 2017-2018 to 429 in the 2018-2019 year) contrasted with a slight increase in overnight stays. These programs will be extended through Woodman Point in 2019-2020.
Capacity building
The Woodman Point Quarantine Station Heritage Trail Project was completed, including physical signs, website content and an interactive app produced in collaboration with Nature Play WA. This received Special Commendation for the trail at the 2019 Western Australian State Heritage Awards in the Interpretation Project category.
 
Point Walter continued planning and development for its Indigenous Cultural Trail Project, which will feature engagement points around the camp site that will share the significance of the site and with visitors and school communities.
Facility management
Works were undertaken at Bickley and Quaranup to complete the first phase refurbishment of aged kitchen infrastructure and improving the storage and food preparation areas. An upgrade was completed at Woodman Point to its Spinifex/Grevillea dormitory group courtyard and designs were developed for a future transit area facility to support day groups and camp changeovers. 
 
At Ern Halliday, masterplan grounds works were undertaken installing a wheel chair accessible access path from the sports stadium to the accommodation precinct. DLGSC staff also oversaw the completion of an asset maintenance plan to inform Strategic Asset Maintenance Plan priorities across the DLGSC camps network.

Aboriginal History Unit

The department responds to requests from native title representative bodies, government agencies, academics, and general researchers in response to applications to access restricted materials. The department is also frequently approached to provide expert knowledge to assist in the development of significant State projects. The department works in partnership with the Aboriginal community and other stakeholders to connect people with Aboriginal history, improve access to restricted records and promote reconciliation in the wider community. 
 
The department provides WA schools with grant funding to undertake activities that promote reconciliation in their local community through the PALS Program. 
 
The Reconciliation Week Street Banner Project provides organisations with the opportunity to publicly demonstrate their pride in Aboriginal culture and commitment to reconciliation.

Key achievements
Aboriginal history research services
The department provided comprehensive responses to 276 family history applications, 34 native title requests, 17 general research applications, 50 confirmation of birth requests, and 3 requests from the public trustee. It also responded to 123 Freedom of Information requests for information relating to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. The department shared information about the National Redress Scheme on social media platforms and provided fact sheets to Aboriginal family history applicants.
 
In 2018-2019, 643 schools across the State received grant funding to develop 678 PALS projects; 58% of all public, private and independent schools in Western Australia participated in the program this reporting year. Around 141,000 students participated in a diverse range of projects to increase understanding of Aboriginal history, culture and language and promote reconciliation. Examples of projects include non-Aboriginal students working with the families of Aboriginal students to translate common English words into the local Aboriginal languages and developing a short film to share the stories and experiences of six Aboriginal women in the local school community.
Reconciliation Week Street Banner Project
The department coordinated 417 Reconciliation Week Street banners sponsored by 124 corporate, government and community organisations across 17 local government areas. 
No Less Worthy
The department launched the publication ‘No Less Worthy’, the first to acknowledge the significant contribution of Aboriginal people with links to Western Australia who volunteered to enlist in WWI. The publication recognises those who served and identifies those who attempted to enlist but were rejected due to the policies of the time. Prior to the release of this publication, only 60-70 Aboriginal volunteers were formally acknowledged on official national registers. Through significant genealogical and archival research, the department has identified nearly double the previous number.

State Records Office

State information management and archival services, which consists of a regulatory/advisory component for all government organisations, as well as management of and access to the State Archives Collection
 
The State Records Office has responsibility for managing the State Archives Collection and for regulating and providing guidance on government recordkeeping. The State Records Act 2000 prescribes the role of the State Records Office, the Director State Records and the State Records Commission.

Key achievements
Government record keeping plans and disposal authorities
During the year, 34 new or amended record keeping plans were assessed, with a further 15 Plans reviewed requiring no amendment. In addition, 12 new or amended disposal authorities were assessed and submitted for approval to the State Records Commission.
Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse
During 2018-2019, the State Records Office continued its participation on the Council of Australasian Archives and Records Authorities Royal Commission Working Group to discuss issues related to implementing the recommendations. The State Records Office also participated in intra-governmental working groups led by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet and the Department of Communities, respectively, as well as contributing information management advice and guidance as a participant on the Catholic Education Office of Western Australia Watch Group.
Born Digital Strategy
In November 2018, the State Records Office released the whole-of-government Born Digital Strategy to provide for improved direction for the creation and management of government records in a purely digital environment. The document sets high-level objectives that encourages government agencies to transition towards fully digital information management environments and discourages the creation of additional paper-based records.
Broadening access to State archives
On 3 June 2019, the State Records Office released its online guide to the 1988 State Cabinet records to signify the release of these records from their 30-year access embargo.
The State Records Office organised for Richard Foy, Chief Archivist and General Manager of Archives New Zealand to deliver the annual Geoffrey Bolton lecture in November 2018 at a large public event at the State Theatre. The scope of the lecture, titled: ‘Digital Assimilation: Resistance is Futile!’, focussed on digital disruption and the role of technology to interrogate the past and review the present.

For the following content please refer to the downloadable PDF of the Annual Report

  • Report on operations
  • Key performance indicators
  • Audit Opinion
  • Certification of finance statements
  • Financial statements
  • Notes to the financial statements

Significant issues and trends

Managing digital risk and expectations

The department has established an ICT Security Compliance Plan to ensure systems are kept up to date, to review the ongoing effectiveness of the ICT security function, and to ensure department staff are security conscious. There is an ongoing need to provide services through modern digital channels. The department has developed a Digital Transformation Strategy to ensure its digital strategic direction aligns with community expectations. 

Liquor Control Legislative reform

The department is developing a number of regulations to support amendments made to the Liquor Control Act 1988 in 2018.  
New regulations are being developed to minimise the adverse impact that packaged liquor outlets can have on the community by limiting the ability for applicants to obtain a liquor licence where sufficient large packaged liquor outlets already exist. 
Further regulations will be introduced to assist police to eliminate ‘sly-grogging’ from communities at greatest risk by allowing them to immediately dispose of any liquor exceeding a prescribed limit, within prescribed areas in the State. In addition, regulations will be developed around the delivery of liquor with the aim of reducing the likelihood of liquor being delivered to juveniles.
 
The department is also working on the development of a legislative framework to regulate the operation of the WA TAB, should it be divested from Racing and Wagering Western Australia.

Local government complaints and investigations

The Local Government Standards Panel (the Standards Panel) established in 2007 provides for a complaints system where minor alleged misconduct by council members can be reviewed. It deals with complaints about council members who it is alleged have committed a breach of one or more of the provisions of the Local Government (Rules of Conduct) Regulations 2007. Administration and support services for the Standards Panel are provided by the department. In 2018-2019, the Standards Panel received 147 new minor breach complaints compared to 82 in 2017-2018, which represents an 80% increase and follows the trend of a continuing rise in the number of complaints referred to the Standards Panel as a result of growing dysfunction at council level.
 
Recent amendments to the Local Government Act 1995 make it compulsory for all candidates nominating in a local government election to complete the department’s online induction and training course. It is hoped these initiatives will provide council members with the skills and knowledge to perform their roles as leaders in their district and see a resulting decrease in dysfunction at council level.
 
The department acknowledges that the Standards Panel is working towards a complaints system for local government that is more responsive and reflective of the contemporary challenges that impact good governance and effective council decision making.  
 
In addition to the ongoing authorised inquiries the department has been undertaking, a significant number of serious breach complaints have been investigated over the year. These investigations have highlighted the areas where the sector requires more support and has identified increased dysfunction at council level. Further capacity building is required to ensure local governments are responding to local needs.
 
The department completes investigations in a comprehensive, efficient, unbiased, legally compliant and effective way. The sole facts relevant to the offence are established through the collection of evidence. The department is committed to conducting investigations in line with the principles of natural justice and procedural fairness, giving local governments and individuals a right of reply for allegations made against them. The outcome of investigations often includes an education component to develop broader understanding of roles and responsibilities.

City of Perth – Panel Inquiry

The department has continued to provide support to the Panel of Inquiry to ensure key milestones are met. The Panel of Inquiry has been extended until 20 January 2020. 
 
On 21 November 2018, the Inquiry commenced its hearings and the Council Assisting, by way of opening submissions, opened the Inquiry to the public. The purpose of the opening was to ensure that members of the public are properly informed about the nature and extent of the Inquiry, its functions, progress to date and some of its likely directions. More than two million items of evidence have been obtained through a range of sources including voluntary interviews and/or using the powers available to the Inquiry including the power to compel the production of documents and/or statements of information. This has yielded multiple lines of inquiry and a significant number of issues requiring further investigation, many of which are serious, systemic and inter-connected and will require public exposure and consideration.

Weight cutting

A review of practices relating to weight cutting has been undertaken by the Combat Sports Commission. The review made a number of recommendations relating to the safety and welfare of contestants when preparing for, and participating in, a contest. The Commission has commenced the process of implementing its dehydration and weight cutting strategy and anticipates this to be fully achieved during 2019-2020. 

Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse – Recommendations 

Western Australia adopted a coordinated and collaborative, cross-agency approach to progress the implementation of recommendations from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. The department is proactively working with peak industry bodies across its sectors to consult and advise on the potential impacts of proposed child safeguarding reforms. The challenge for the department is to ensure that community organisations are supported to provide child safe environments and a balance is achieved between capacity building and appropriately applied regulation.

Funding for culture and arts

In 2018-2019 significant work was undertaken on developing a Cultural Infrastructure Strategy. The absence of a cultural infrastructure fund to meet unmet demand for infrastructure improvements has been consistently highlighted as an issue across Western Australia.  Further, funding requests to culture and arts project grant programs are continually oversubscribed. 

Funding for community sporting and recreation facilities

A 2016 evaluation of the $12 million per annum Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund found that a considerable increase in funding is required in order to maintain participation levels, and to fully meet the demand for the development of new facilities and redevelopment of existing facilities.

Disclosures and compliance

Pricing policies

When analysing its fees and charges, the department considers the Department of Treasury’s recommendation that agencies should achieve full cost recovery where possible. When a fee was charged it was reviewed annually under Treasurer’s Instruction 810 and the fee set in accordance with the Costing and Pricing Government Services Guidelines published by the Department of Treasury, unless prescribed by legislation. 

Major capital projects

His Majesty’s Theatre refurbishment

The department continued project delivery of the $6.5 million refurbishment of His Majesty’s Theatre to maintain the world-class venue for opera, dance and theatre. During 2018-2019, an orchestra pit lift to improve occupational health and safety was installed; replacing the previous pit, which needed to be opened and closed manually. The new lift enables the floor to be automatically moved between the pit and auditorium levels.
 
During 2018-2019, planning for the second stage of the refurbishment commenced, which will see improvements to His Majesty’s Theatre’s public areas; providing more hospitality opportunities and upgrades of the foyer areas. The upgrades will assist in conserving the Theatre’s cultural significance, and enhancing the conservation and preservation of the iconic building in the Perth central business district.
 

Elevate

The department is progressing this election commitment and working with the Art Gallery of Western Australia to develop a business case that provides the proposed design and cost of the $10 million redevelopment of the Art Gallery rooftop as a regular cultural and commercial venue.
 

New museum project

The department is working closely with the Western Australian Museum and the Department of Finance to deliver the $400 million new museum project. 
 
Developed in the heart of the Perth Cultural Centre, the new museum will share the stories of our people and place; acting as a gateway to explore all of Western Australia. It will reflect the extraordinary history, distinctiveness, creativity and diversity of our State and region.

Unauthorised use of credit cards

A number of DLGSC officers hold corporate cards where their functions warrant usage of this facility, and card holders are reminded of their obligations under the credit card policy. In 2018-2019 there were two recorded uses of credit cards for non-work-related purchases totalling $139.35. Both incidents were the result of inadvertent error on the part of the employee concerned and were reported promptly to the Chief Finance Officer for rectification. Disciplinary action was not taken on either of the occasions due to the circumstances, minor expenditure value, and prompt settlement of the personal use amounts by the officers concerned.

Industrial relations

All staff are employed under the Public Sector Management Act 1994 and their employment conditions are those outlined in the Public Service Award 1992, and the Public Service and Government Officers General Agreement 2017.

Workers’ compensation

In 2018-2019 there were 11 claims as at 30 June 2019. Of the 11 claims, nine claims recorded greater than one day of total time lost, estimated at 482 days. Of the nine claims, three were related to estimated lost time greater than 60 days each. 
One additional lost time claim of 65 days was approved post 30 June 2018, where the date of injury in the claim was in 2017-2018.  

Government builder contracts

In accordance with the provisions of the Premier’s Circular 2015-02 – Government Building Training Policy, the department did not directly issue any in-scope contracts or maintenance contracts with a $2 million plus labour component, and as such is not required to report against this policy.
 
The department notes that the new museum project, which is being delivered by the Department of Finance, reported a peak workforce of 298 workers on-site. The majority of this workforce was West Australian. In addition, 60 local apprentices were engaged by the head contractor and its sub-contractors. 

Ministerial directives

No ministerial directives were received during 2018-2019.

For the following content please refer to the downloadable PDF of the Annual Report

  • TI945 Budget Estimates
  • Governance disclosures

Appendices

  • Funding programs
Page reviewed 25 June 2019