Promotion of Liquor

Information for licensees about the promotion of liquor.

Selling Liquor on the internet

Liquor retailers can utilise the internet to sell packaged liquor provided:

  • they have a valid liquor licence from any state or territory in Australia to do so;
  • sales and deliveries are not made to a juvenile; and
  • specific information is included on the licensee's internet website (if one exists).

As from August 2007, the requirement for information to be included on a website applies to:

  • Hotel licences;
  • Liquor store licences;
  • Producers licences;
  • Wholesaler's licences; and
  • Special facility licences that authorise the sale and supply of packaged liquor.

The information to be included on a website includes:

  • Licence number;
  • Class of licence;
  • Name of licensee;
  • Address and telephone number for the licensed premises; and
  • The following notice :

Warning

Under the Liquor Control Act 1988, it is an offence:

  • To sell or supply liquor to a person under the age of 18 years on licensed or regulated premises; or
  • For a person under the age of 18 years to purchase, or attempt to purchase, liquor on licensed or regulated premises.

Related policy

Liquor promotions policy

To further support the harm-minimisation objectives of the Liquor Control Act 1988, the Director or Liquor Licensing has developed an industry guideline for the responsible promotion of liquor for consumption on premises.

This guideline is designed to provide the industry with a framework of practices which are considered acceptable and reasonable, and discourage those that are not in the public interest.

Gimmick promotions of cheap or discounted liquor that are likely to encourage the irresponsible consumption of alcohol are not acceptable as is any activity that creates an incentive for patrons to consume liquor more rapidly or in greater amounts than they otherwise would.

Related policy

Prohibited products

The Governor of Western Australia, on recommendation of the Minister, may make regulations that ban any alcoholic product if it is considered to be undesirable, or if its availability is not in the best interests of the public.

This may occur with products that appeal to children in the way they are marketed and packaged, or where the product is likely to be confused with soft drink or confectionary.

The types of products that may be considered undesirable include:

 

  • Alcoholic vapour

  • Alcoholic aerosol products

  • Alcoholic iceblocks

  • Alcoholic milk

Tastings

A 'tasting' is a small amount of liquor supplied by a licensee for sampling purposes. It is intended to assist customers choose a product. It is not a standard drink measure.

There are only three licence classifications that require additional authorisation in order to provide tastings to customers. They are:

  1. Liquor store licences
  2. Wholesaler's licences
  3. Producer's licences

Tasting amounts are:

  • Wine 50ml
  • Beer 100ml
  • Spirits 15ml

Liquor Store Licence

A liquor store licensee is allowed to supply a tasting provided:

  • The sample is consumed on the premises;
  • The licensee has the authority of the Director of Liquor Licensing to do so under the conditions of their licence;
  • The sample is free; and
  • The product served is from the liquor store licensee's stock.

A liquor store licensee cannot offer customers free samples of liquor directly from a producer's or wholesaler's stock.

The liquor store licensee must supervise and manage the tasting, and supply all samples offered to potential buyers.

A liquor store licensee can utilise the services of a producer or wholesaler when presenting a tasting session to customers, provided the samples come from the liquor store's stock.

A producer or wholesaler will be in breach of the Liquor Control Act if they conduct a tasting with the general public at a liquor store using stock they own.

Wholesaler's Licence

A wholesaler is permitted to provide a tasting provided:

  • The sample is consumed on the licensed premise;
  • The licensee has the authority of the Director of Liquor Licensing to do so under the conditions of their licence; and
  • The sample is free.

A wholesaler can assist in conducting a tasting session at a liquor store provided the liquor store licensee supervises and manages the tasting, and supplies all samples offered to potential buyers.

A wholesaler can conduct a tasting away from their own licensed premises provided:

  • the tasting takes place at another licensed premises; and
  • the tasting is for consumption by the licensee, approved manager or an employee or agent of the other licensed premises.

In this instance, the purpose of the tasting must be for obtaining an order of product.

Producer's Licence

A producer is allowed to supply a tasting provided:

  • the sample is consumed on premise;
  • the licensee has the authority of the Director of Liquor Licensing to do so under the conditions of their licence; and
  • the sample is produced on the approved premises.

Producers are not bound by supplying free samples to customers and can charge for any tasting offered.

Under the terms of a producer's licence, producers are not permitted to provide samples or tastings of their product away from their own premises.

For example, a producer cannot conduct a tasting session at a liquor store with product they own.

A producer can assist in conducting a tasting session at a liquor store provided the liquor store licensee supervises and manages the tasting, and supplies all samples offered to potential buyers.

A producer can conduct a tasting away from their licensed premises provided:

  • the tasting takes place at another licensed premises; and
  • the tasting is for consumption by the licensee, approved manager or an employee or agent of the other licensed premises.

In this instance, the purpose of the tasting must be for obtaining an order of product.

Related policy

Page reviewed 04 June 2019